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Brachial plexus MRI anatomy

Approximate MRI anatomy of the brachial plexus, including the preganglionic rootlets. Radiology Technologists Drink Cold Beer is a helpful mnemonic to remember component of the brachial plexus: Roots Trunks Divisions Cords Branche This MRI brachial plexus cross sectional anatomy tool is absolutely free to use. Use the mouse scroll wheel to move the images up and down alternatively use the tiny arrows (>>) on both side of the image to move the images.s The brachial plexus (MR): anatomy atlas of the thoracic outlet, pectoral girdle, and axillary fossa Anatomy of the brachial plexus on MR imaging (thoracic outlet, pectoral girdle, and axillary fossa

Brachial plexus anatomy Radiology Case Radiopaedia

MRI brachial plexus anatomy free MRI coronal cross

The brachial plexus (MR): anatomy atlas of the thoracic

  1. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves innervating the muscles of the shoulder, upper chest, and arm. The brachial plexus is formed by the anterior rami of C5 through T1 (Option B is the correct answer) [4, 5] . The brachial plexus is not formed by just the posterior cervical sensory rootlets (Option A is not correct). Because the anterior rami contain a mixture of motor and sensory fibers, many patients with brachial plexus lesions present with mixed symptoms
  2. ed by using key anatomic landmarks. Applying this anatomic knowledge, a radiologist should then be able to identify pathologic appearances of the brachial plexus by using imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and US
  3. MRI anatomy: This section will provide a descriptive illustration of the normal anatomy of the different parts of the brachial plexus on sagittal, coronal and axial MR images. SUMMARY MRI is the imaging modality of choice in evaluating the complex anatomy of the brachial plexus and in assessing the integrity of its different parts
  4. The brachial plexus is a somatic nerve plexus formed by intercommunications among the ventral rami of the nerve roots C5, C6, C7, C8 and T1 with occasional contributions from C4 and T2

The brachial plexus is an arrangement of nerve fibres, running from the spine, formed by the ventral rami of the lower cervical and upper thoracic nerve roots it includes -from above the fifth cervical vertebra to underneath the first thoracic vertebra (C5-T1).It proceeds through the neck, the axilla and into the arm Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. 700 MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology Carlos Torres Figure 1 The number of slices in the localizer sequence.

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originate in the spinal cord in the neck, travel down the neck (via the cervicoaxillary canal) and into the armpit. It contain the nerves that, with only a few exceptions, are responsible for sensation (sensory function) and movement (motor function) of the arms, hands, and fingers Brachial plexus disorders can be diagnostic challenges, owing to the region's complex anatomy and nonspecific symptomatology. MRI remains the best modality for assessing the brachial plexus (BP), due to its superior soft-tissue contrast compared to CT or ultrasound

Brachial Plexus – Art as Applied to Medicine

Brachial plexus MRI scans are diagnostically highly relevant. However, the routine examination of the brachial plexus is made difficult by its structure and anatomy. Since imaging staff rarely perform such examinations, they often do so with trepidation and, as a result, may make errors Introduction. The brachial plexus is a major neural structure, providing motor and sensory innervation to the upper extremity. Although a number of modalities are available for imaging of the brachial plexus—including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT) (, 1-, 5), and most recently ultrasonography (US) (, 6)—MR imaging is the modality of choice because of its. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist

The brachial plexus is a network of nerve fibres that supplies the skin and musculature of the upper limb. It begins in the root of the neck, passes through the axilla, and runs through the entire upper extremity Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging technique for the evaluation of the brachial plexus. This article recalls brachial plexus anatomy and details MRI radioanatomy. T1 weighted and STIR sequences are required. Gadolinium injection is not systematic

Video: Brachial plexus Radiology Reference Article

The brachial plexus: normal anatomy, pathology, and MR

http://www.anatomyzone.com3D anatomy tutorial on the branches of the brachial plexus using the BioDigital Human (http://www.biodigitalhuman.com). This tutori.. Brachial plexus. 1. BRACHIAL PLEXUS Maj Rishi Pokhrel Dept of Anatomy NAIHS 1 www.slideshare.net. 2. Objective At the end of this class students should be able to • Draw diagram of brachial plexus with all branches • Enumerate the root value of all branches of brachial plexus • Identify lesions of brachial plexus. 3 The brachial plexus is formed by the anterior primary rami of c5 through t1 and provides sensory and motor innervation of the upper extremity. Injuries or lesions can occur in the brachial plexus region as a result of shoulder trauma inflammations and even due to tumors. Anatomy of brachial plexus The brachial plexus provides motor and sensory innervation to the upper extremity. MRI is the gold standardfor the assessment ofthe brachial plexus owing to its superior soft tissue resolution in depicting brachial plexus anatomy, as well as its multiplanar capabilities 7. Torres C, Mailley K, Del Carpio O'Donovan R. MRI of the brachial plexus: modified imaging technique leading to a be er characteriza on of its anatomy and pathology. Neuroradiol J. 2013; 26(6):699-719. 8. Silbermann-Hoffman O, Teboul F. Post-trauma c brachial plexus MRI in prac ce. Diagn Interv Imaging. 2013; 94(10):925-43. 9

Brachial Plexopathy - Radsource

Anatomy . The brachial plexus stems from the cervical spinal cord and extends to the axillary region to form the nerves that control movement in the upper limbs [1]: The brachial plexus is divided into roots, trunks, divisions, cords and branches ()5 roots: formed from cervical nerves (C5 to C8) and the first thoracic nerve (T1 for traumatic brachial plexus injuries, 83.3% for entrapment syndrome, and 83.7% for post-treatment evaluation [17]. Brachial plexus MRI is best preformed with the patients in the supine position and their arms placed at the side, by using a multi-element, phased-array radiofrequency receiver coil

Prevertebral Ganglia And Plexus - Anatomy - Mitch Medical

MRI brachial plexus anatomy Thanks for sharing such beautiful information with us. I hope you will share some more information about anatomy. Please keep sharing. Health Is A Life . May 17, 2020 at 5:33 AM john danilla said... I am John Danilla from UK( northern ireland), i want to share SUMMARY: With advancement in 3D imaging, better fat-suppression techniques, and superior coil designs for MR imaging and the increasing availability and use of 3T magnets, the visualization of the complexity of the brachial plexus has become facile. The relevant imaging findings are described for normal and pathologic conditions of the brachial plexus Brachial plexus. Lesions coming from the cervico-brachial plexus are expected to be found in a more paraspinal location. Vertebral artery and vein Are not involved. Prevertebral and paraspinal musculature. The lesion is clearly arising from the left paraspinal musculature. Step 3 The normal fat planes between the individual muscles have. furthermore, the option of sticking a needle in is high risk. MRI provides a multiplanar non-invasive approach for baseline evaluation, and hence can be crucial in dictating further management in both trauma and oncology setting. Normal Anatomy Brachial plexus is formed by the ventral rami of C5-T1 (Fig 1) lying between anterior an

The brachial plexus is a major network of nerves transmitting signals responsible for motor and sensory innervation of the upper extremities, including the shoulder, arm, and hand. It originates from the ventral rami of C5 through T1 spinal nerves.[1][2][3][4] Proximally to distally, the brachial plexus is comprised of roots, trunks, divisions, cords, and terminal branches The brachial plexus can be easily identified on MRI by first identifying the anterior scalene muscle. The brachial plexus and subclavian artery (relationship outlined above) are deep to the anterior scalene. Normal components of the brachial plexus have low signal intensity on images obtained with all sequences and are surrounded by fat

Diagnosing brachial plexus pathology can be clinically challenging, often necessitating further evaluation with MRI. Owing to its vague symptomatology, uncommon nature, and complex anatomy, the brachial plexus presents a diagnostic dilemma to clinicians and radiologists alike and has been the subject of many prior reviews offering various perspectives on its imaging and pathology The brachial plexus can be identified on MRI by first identifying the anterior scalene muscle. The brachial plexus and subclavian artery (relationship outlined above) are deep to the anterior scalene. The roots are best seen on axial images, whereas the remaining components are well seen on coronal and sagittal images The brachial plexus is a major neural structure that provides sensory and motor innervation to the upper extremity. Different imaging modalities can be used to study the brachial plexus, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) 1, however MRI is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of.

sonance imaging (MRI) is the examination of reference imaging for the explora-tion of the brachial plexus [4]. The microsurgery considerably improved the results of the surgery of the Anatomy of the Brachial Plexus: A Rare Variation in the Laboratory of Anatomy of Bamako (Mali The evaluation of brachial plexus is based on clinical assessments, electrophysiologic examinations, and imaging studies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for depicting the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus [ 7 - 9 ], helping in the identification, localization, and characterization of the lesions Introduction. The brachial plexus is a major neural structure that provides sensory and motor innervation to the upper extremity. Different imaging modalities can be used to study the brachial plexus, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) 1, however MRI is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its.

Figure 2. An illustration showing the brachial plexus origin and its branches. Erb, or Erb-Duchenne palsy, is the name given to a typical upper brachial plexus injury involving spinal nerve roots C5 and C6.In contrast, Klumpke's, or Klumpke-Dejerine palsy, affects the lower roots of the brachial plexus (C8, T1).Both these types of lesions usually involve a specific injury mechanism that. Introduction. Ultrasound (US) is a largely available, cost-effective and innocuous technique to assess the brachial plexus. US can be considered as an alternative to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in all clinical settings in which MRI is contraindicated, not readily available or in case of claustrophobia [].US can be used for the assessment of the brachial plexus in case of trauma, tumours. Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and.

MR Imaging of the Brachial Plexus Radiology Ke

Welcome to Online MRI & CT Sectional Anatomy. Online MRI & CT Sectional Anatomy (OMCSA K-anatomy) is probably one of the most user-friendly and convenient online interface for human anatomy atlas. brachial plexus Free. 218 Images shoulder Free. 152 Images arm Member. 90 Images elbow Free. 152 Images forearm Member. 136 Images. Brachial Plexus Anatomy Differential Diagnosis Of Thoracic The brachial plexus is an arrangement of nerve fibres running from the spine formed by the ventral rami of the lower cervical and upper thoracic nerve roots it includes from above the fifth cervical vertebra to underneath the first thoracic vertebrac5 t1it proceeds through the neck Brachial Plexus Injuries. Brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) can involve any degree of injury at any level of the plexus and range from obstetric injuries to traumatic avulsions. Diagnosis requires focused physical examination with EMG/NCS and MRI studies used for confirmation as needed Brachial Plexus Diagram Nervous And Musculoskeletal. 1 Brachial Plexus Its Applied Anatomy 1. Gross Anatomy Brachial Plexus Essentials Draw It To Know It. The Brachial Plexus Sections Branches Teachmeanatomy. Mnemonic Anatomy Brachial Plexus. Accessphysiotherapy Brachial Plexus And Peripheral Nerves Schnittanatomie im MRT des Plexus brachialis, der oberen Thoraxapertur und der Achselhöhle. The brachial plexus (MR): anatomy atlas of the thoracic outlet, pectoral girdle, and axillary fossa. Superior thoracic aperture; Thoracic inlet: Anatomy, MRI Sagittal section

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves (formed by the anterior rami of the lower four cervical nerves and first thoracic nerve (C5, C6, C7, C8, and T1).This plexus extends from the spinal cord, through the cervicoaxillary canal in the neck, over the first rib, and into the armpit.It supplies afferent and efferent nerve fibers to the chest, shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven to be beneficial in presenting anatomy of interest for regional anaesthesia and in demonstrating spread of local anaesthetic. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the anatomy as shown by MRI of the brachial plexus in the axillary region Compromising abnormalities of the brachial plexus displays the blood supply to a nerve model, 3D mass effect from silicone rupture, thyroid goiter, fractured clavicle, body builder (enlarged muscles), and anomalous muscle that triggered complaints of thoracic outlet syndrome. Published online January 24th, 2005 Clinical Anatomy volume 8 issue 1.

Traumatic brachial plexus paralysis in adults mostly affects young people between 20 and 30 years old. Ninety percent of cases are due to motorbike accidents. The mechanism of the injury involves stretching of the brachial plexus nerves which may lead to two types of damage: avulsion, or tearing off of the insertion of the nerve roots from the. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and. This is the best way to learn anatomy! Sick of long and boring videos? These lectures are concise, engaging, and effective! Want to learn usmle anatomy, com.. Brachial plexitis is seen on MRI as focal or diffuse hyperintense signal in brachial plexus. 3.Brachial plexus tumors : Nerve sheath tumors (schwannoma and neurofibroma) are seen as ovoid lesions isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images with 'target' sign

shoulder anatomy | mri shoulder axial anatomy | free cross

lower subscapular nerve (C5 and C6) - nerve that supplies teres major. medial cord. cord that is formed by the anterior divisions of the lower trunk (C8 and T1) 1. ulnar nerve. 2. medial pectoral nerve. 3. medial cutaneous nerves. 4. contributes to median nerve. 3 nerves that branch off of medial cord Sureka et al. MRI of brachial plexopathies. Clinical radiology (2009) vol. 64 (2) pp. 208-18. Gerevini et al. Diagnostic value and surgical implications of the magnetic resonance imaging in the management of adult patients with brachial plexus pathologies Abstract. Tumors of the brachial plexus can be challenging from a diagnostic and management perspective. Once suspected based on history and physical exam, several imaging modalities such as MRI and high-resolution ultrasound can confirm the lesion and distinguish it from surrounding nerves

The brachial plexus: normal anatomy, pathology, and MR imagin

Prefixed brachial plexus - the plexus is formed from C4 to C8 instead of C5 to T1. Postfixed brachial plexus - the plexus is formed from C6 to T2. In this case, the inferior trunk of the plexus may be compressed by the 1st rib, producing neurovascular symptoms in the upper limb. Formation of trunks, divisions, and cords may be different Interpreting imaging studies of peripheral nerve diseases and especially the brachial plexus (BP) and lumbosacral plexus (LSP) can be challenging. It requires a firm knowledge of the anatomy. It is just as important to be familiar with the end-organ innervations and the surrounding structures, the latter serving as important landmarks Brachial Plexus Anatomy Mr Report images, similar and related articles aggregated throughout the Internet

Brachial plexus: Anatomy, branches and mnemonics Kenhu

Navigation best viewed on larger screens. Try using search on phones and tablets The axillary region is regularly used for brachial plexus block. The technique may be guided by nerve stimulation, ultrasound or a combination of nerve stimulation and ultrasound. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been beneficial in presenting anatomy of interest for regional anesthesia and in demonstrating spread of local anesthetic (LA) A brachial plexus MRI exam will be ordered when a physician wants a detailed look at the nerves that start in the cervical spine and go into the right or left arm. Soft Tissue Neck MRI A physician may order this type of MRI if they want to see all the soft tissues from the bottom of your eyes to the top of your chest The brachial plexus (BP), established by the lap twigs of the last four cervical nerves and the first thoracic nerve, assures the driving and sensory innervation of the thoracic member. We bring back a case of rare anatomical variation of the brachial plexus. It is a 34-year-old corpse dissected in the laboratory of anatomy of the Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology of Bamako in. Traumatic Injuries of the Brachial Plexus, Dr. Megan Mills (1-29-21) Rewind 10 seconds MRI Online is a premium online continuing education resource for practicing radiologists to expand their radiology expertise across all modalities, read a wide variety of cases, and become a more accurate, confident, and efficient reader

Brachial Plexopathy: A Review of Traumatic and

Brachial Plexus Injury and Related Anatomy. BP is most important anatomical structure in the Shoulder Girdle. Tangled and short plexus started from. Intervertebral Foramens and finishing in Axilla Pyramid. We divide the BP in six parts: Roots, Trunks, Divisions, Cords and Branches. Mnemonic is Rodger Tailor is Drums Composition Boss Typically, the brachial plexus is formed from C5-T1; in some cases with there is a contribution from C4 (prefixed, 28-62%) or T2 (postfixed, 16-73%). All nerve supply to the upper extremity passes through this plexus. The brachial plexus starts at the scalenes, courses under the clavicle, and ends at the axilla Brachial Plexus Mri Anatomy - Human Anatomy. Brachial and Lumbosacral Plexus and Peripheral Nerves MRI, ultrasound diagnose post-COVID-19 muscle weakness. Figure 6 from Brain Reorganization in Patients with Brachial and Lumbosacral Plexus and Peripheral Nerves. brh xray protocol: CORONAL: T1WI,T2WI, STIR AXIAL: T1WI,T2WI, STIR SAGITTAL: T1WI,T2WI, STIR IF GD injection Post Gd T1W/FS of 3 planes Report template Example: References: Technique: Brachial plexus: protocol and planning (from MRI master.com) Diagnostic approach: Imaging the Anatomy of theBrachial Plexus: Review andSelf-Assessment Module; AJR 2005 december Brachial Plexus Evaluation with MRI. MRI of the brachial plexus: A pictorial review Hendrik W. van Es∗, Thomas L. Bollen, Hans P.M. van Heesewijk Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein, The Netherlands article info Article history: Received 13 May 2009 Accepted 13 May 2009 Keywords: Brachial plexus MRI Tumor Trauma.

Intermediate Brachial Plexus Injury Medical Illustration

etiology tionsof brachial plexus lesions.12 The In goals of this review are to study brachial plexus anatomy, cicular describe the study protocol for MRN and the main diseases sequences, that can affect it. Anatomic analysis of the brachial plexus through MRIs MRI anatomic analysis of the brachial plexus beneted sig-nicantly from neurographic. Hand Clin 21 (2005) 25-37 Imaging the Brachial Plexus Kimberly K. Amrami, MDa,*, John D. Port, MD, PhDb a Division of Body MRI, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA b Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA The brachial plexus is a network of nerves sup- Multiple imaging. Introduction Diffusion Tensor MRI (DT-MRI) is a promising tool for the evaluation of brachial plexus pathology. Therefore, we introduce and evaluate a fast DT-MRI protocol (8min33s scanning with 5-10 min postprocessing time) for the brachial plexus. Materials and methods Thirty healthy volunteers within three age-groups (18-35, 36-55, and > 56) received DT-MRI of the brachial-plexus twice The brachial plexus is a complex intercommunicating network of nerves formed by spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8 and T1. It supplies all sensory innervation to the upper limb and most of the axilla, with the exception of an area of the medial upper arm and axilla, which is supplied by the intercostobrachial nerve T2

Brachial Plexopathy - Radsourc

The characterization of brachial plexus (BP) pathology can be perplexing for the radiologist, especially due to varying combination of sensory and motor symptoms depending on the extent of disease and the level of disease process. Localization can be difficult due to inherently complex anatomy of the BP complicated by a variety of benign and malignant disease processes. Infrequently requested. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves supplying sensory and motor innervation to the upper extremities extending from its origins from the C5 through T1 nerve roots laterally to the axilla. Clinically, evaluating lesions that involve the brachial plexus is challenging because of its inaccessibility to palpation and the complexity of its anatomy: the C5 and C6 rami form the upper trunk. High-quality, high-resolution CT and MRI remain the mainstays for imaging the brachial plexus. AB - Imaging the brachial plexus is challenging because of the complex anatomy of the region and the wide variety of pathology that can affect it. For the purpose of imaging, it is helpful to divide traumatic and nontraumatic entities affecting the.

Imaging the Anatomy of the Brachial Plexus: Review and

of brachial plexus compromise were demonstrated. Our technique with 3-D reconstruc- tion increased the definition of brachial plexus pathology. The increased anatomical definition enabled the vascular surgeons and neurosurgeons to improve patient care. Brachial plexus in vivo anatomy as displayed by MRI, magnetic resonance angiograph Summary. This chapter discusses normal anatomy of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, muscle denervation, brachial plexus traction injury, inflammatory disorders, peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) and other neoplasms. The brachial plexus is formed by a complex convergence of the ventral branches of the sixth, seventh, and eighth cervical. Arun S Mri Protocols Mri Brachial Plexus Anatomy In the evaluation of patient falls there must be specific documentation in the medical record that central nervous system cns injury is a possible diagnosis based upon historical information about the traumatic eventinjury and the post fall physical examination The anatomy of normal brachial plexus was studied using anatomy and radiology texts and publications. RTOG guidelines, American Society of Radiation Oncology Continuing Medical Education (ASTRO CME) and anatomy texts were consulted for brachial plexus contouring ( 8 , 12 - 14 )

Anatomy, Imaging, and Pathologic Conditions of the

Brachial Plexus. The brachial plexus part of neck anatomy is a complex region of nerve fibers that run from the spine, proceed through the neck, into the armpit and through the arm. These nerve fibers include the ventral rami of the first thoracic nerve root (T1) and the lower four cervical nerve roots (C5) The diagnosis of brachial plexus injuries presents a clinical dilemma due to both complex anatomy and varied symptomology [1]. Imaging with CT myelography and MRI have both been utilised in the evaluation of nerve injuries involving the brachial plexus, with a focus on the identification of preganglionic injuries. In the hyperacut MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS. MRI of the peripheral nerves (MR neurography) has been increasingly used in recent years, due to advancements in MRI techniques. It is an excellent modality for obtaining detailed anatomic information on the brachial plexus (Fig. 1) and to accurately localise any pathology. MRI of the brachial. Brachial plexus injuries qualify as one of the most debilitating injuries afflicting the upper extremity. Therefore, intricate knowledge of the anatomy of the brachial plexus and its variations is critical to improving the diagnosis, management, and treatment of any injuries to the brachial plexus The purpose of this exhibit is: 1. To review the radiological anatomy of the brachial plexus on MRI in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients. 2. Use CT-MRI fusion software to determine the brachial plexus position on CT from MRI imaging. 3. To determine a method for consistent contouring of the brachial plexus in IMRT planning

MRI is the imaging modality of choice to evaluate the anatomy and pathologic conditions of the brachial plexus. Single axial, coronal plane, and sagittal plane are difficult to show the whole course of brachial plexus structures because the image plane is not aligned with the orientation of the brachial plexus The relative advantage of MRI over CT myelography is the non-invasiveness and much higher image quality of the brachial plexus. MRI is also useful for visualization of the postganglionic brachial plexus, and for distinguishing from benign and malignant tumorous lesions81). Signal intensity changes of the spinal cord are accompanied in 20% of. Brachial Plexus Injury and Related Anatomy. BP is most important anatomical structure in the Shoulder Girdle. Tangled and short plexus started from. Intervertebral Foramens and finishing in Axilla Pyramid. We divide the BP in six parts: Roots, Trunks, Divisions, Cords and Branches. Mnemonic is Rodger Tailor is Drums Composition Boss